Where credit’s due.

I think we owe it to the makers who choose to share their visual art via the internet to find out who they are, care who they are and credit them wherever possible.

There are currently no good ways for makers to personally monetise digitally diasporic visual art made for or shared on the internet. I don’t believe that there’s a workable, widely used Spotify, Youtube or PRS-alike for image works yet, so credit, kudos and PR are the only wage a visual artist earns online.

It’s rare to see a piece of music or a non-commercial film shared without an artist credit, but somehow the same impulse to pay respects doesn’t carry over to still work.

I just flicked through over 30 posts of a work by Pawel Nolbert which has clearly influenced (and was influenced by) a wide range of creatives, and not one of the posters bothered to mention who made it or link to the maker.

At least when you torrent a track the artist benefits from a widened audience. If an image is contagious, more often than not each generation of posters divorce it further from the owner. Eventually, effectively no-one owns the work, which means the impact, impulse and context are truncated at the piece rather than expanded via the maker.

Google has a ‘search with an image’ tool which is very easy to use. I wish more people did. I hope that those who teach creative subjects also pound home the need for explicit, direct, linked crediting now more than ever.


http://www.google.com/insidesearch/features/images/searchbyimage.html

3 months ago
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Excerpt from ‘The Flatness’ series, photograph, Erin O’Keefe.
The unintended line joining images that I have recently connected with and shared here might be an interrogation of materials, materiality, digital tools and assembly/collage/bricolage.
American artist and architect O’Keefe describes this series of still life photographs as an exploration of ‘the tendency of the camera to flatten pictorial space, and as a result, foster ambiguous spatial readings’.
They do this spectacularly, and even better seem to playfully question photo-realistic ambition in painting.

Although the photographs are clearly the result of discipline, planning and a comprehensive understanding of optics, by employing a very human approach to constructing the props, painting the scenes and selecting and applying digital tools to the surfaces of physical objects, the outcome is warm and casual rather than cold and austere; two adjectives I circle but generally end up settling on when describing photo-realistic artworks.
I also enjoy imagining that in this particular example O’Keefe is referencing  Bauhaus palette and neoplasictist line - then distorting them both through an off-kilter frame and a compositional focal point that is unmistakably Photoshop’s ‘Lighting Effects’ rendering filter circa 1998.

Excerpt from ‘The Flatness’ series, photograph, Erin O’Keefe.

The unintended line joining images that I have recently connected with and shared here might be an interrogation of materials, materiality, digital tools and assembly/collage/bricolage.

American artist and architect O’Keefe describes this series of still life photographs as an exploration of ‘the tendency of the camera to flatten pictorial space, and as a result, foster ambiguous spatial readings’.

They do this spectacularly, and even better seem to playfully question photo-realistic ambition in painting.

Although the photographs are clearly the result of discipline, planning and a comprehensive understanding of optics, by employing a very human approach to constructing the props, painting the scenes and selecting and applying digital tools to the surfaces of physical objects, the outcome is warm and casual rather than cold and austere; two adjectives I circle but generally end up settling on when describing photo-realistic artworks.

I also enjoy imagining that in this particular example O’Keefe is referencing  Bauhaus palette and neoplasictist line - then distorting them both through an off-kilter frame and a compositional focal point that is unmistakably Photoshop’s ‘Lighting Effects’ rendering filter circa 1998.

6 months ago
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From ‘Reja-Dispositivo Cinético/Social’, metal & vinyl paint 2012, Daniel Medina
I’m sure I’m not alone in sometimes finding that the artworks which most rigorously and inexpressively apply simple ideas - and are therefore taken by some to be the most dispassionate and aloof - are those which somehow convey the most empathy.Having just read Daniel Medina artist’s statement I understand that this installation has a rich theoretical foundation, but right now it seems more like a brilliant visual metaphor for Monday.

From ‘Reja-Dispositivo Cinético/Social’, metal & vinyl paint 2012, Daniel Medina

I’m sure I’m not alone in sometimes finding that the artworks which most rigorously and inexpressively apply simple ideas - and are therefore taken by some to be the most dispassionate and aloof - are those which somehow convey the most empathy.

Having just read Daniel Medina artist’s statement I understand that this installation has a rich theoretical foundation, but right now it seems more like a brilliant visual metaphor for Monday.

6 months ago
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Mélange, wax pencil on paper, 2013, Christina Empedocles
I bookmarked Christina Empedocles’ portfolio at least two years ago now, and am even more excited today than I was then by the way her wax pencil drawings luxuriate in complex compositions, compound shadows, textures  and inflections of light.
A series of film projects I’ve worked on over the last year provided an unexpected opportunity to think about materials in ways I hadn’t previously considered, and as a result I’m perhaps more engaged with texture and tactility in art and design than ever before.
During a visit to the Whitechapel Gallery’s fantastic Hannah Höch exhibition yesterday evening I found myself as drawn to the outcome of her research, selection and assembly as I was to the way the glue binding the elements together warped and distorted the paper it was mounted upon, and the tiny shadows the cut out and stacked pieces cast upon each other under close scrutiny.

Mélange, wax pencil on paper, 2013, Christina Empedocles

I bookmarked Christina Empedocles’ portfolio at least two years ago now, and am even more excited today than I was then by the way her wax pencil drawings luxuriate in complex compositions, compound shadows, textures  and inflections of light.

A series of film projects I’ve worked on over the last year provided an unexpected opportunity to think about materials in ways I hadn’t previously considered, and as a result I’m perhaps more engaged with texture and tactility in art and design than ever before.

During a visit to the Whitechapel Gallery’s fantastic Hannah Höch exhibition yesterday evening I found myself as drawn to the outcome of her research, selection and assembly as I was to the way the glue binding the elements together warped and distorted the paper it was mounted upon, and the tiny shadows the cut out and stacked pieces cast upon each other under close scrutiny.

6 months ago
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Selections from the ‘Bird Rib’ series (oil on canvas) and ‘Cansei de ser sexy’ series (digital image), 2008-2013,  Maurizio Bongiovanni.

Studies at the Academy for Digital Arts and Sciences of Siena, a fascination with ornithologist/composer/polymath Messiaen and a passion for both the exotic and the erotic inform the distinctive look of Bongiovanni’s artworks, many of which are planned in a digital workspace before being finalised in the chosen medium.

Whether rendered in oils on canvas or as purely digital works, 
his view seems as influenced by consumer digital image-making tools as it is surrealism and vorticism, and is as effective deconstructing scenes of natural beauty as it is abstracting sexually charged tableau.

6 months ago
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Untitled wood engravings, 2012-2014, Peter Bosteels.

Peter Bosteels is Professor of Blockprint in the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp, Belgium.

The few pieces of his I have found online are untitled and/or poorly attributed, which is frustrating as every work I’ve seen is fantastic and combines the vague portentousness of tarot illustrations with an oddly contemporary sense of fashion and style.

6 months ago
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Untitled 84, Derrick Velasquez
Californian bookbinder-turned-artist Derrick Velasquez’ ‘Untitled’ series features layered strips of coloured vinyl hung from wall-mounted wooden forms. Gravity, accretion, repetition and colour act to create gently resolving shapes and to suggest nature from largely synthetic components.
The accumulated pieces are colourful and graphic but reassuringly full of life, like the manes of brightly rendered animals from a children’s picture book. The works developed from the artist exploring his regular craftsman’s process of hand-cutting enclosure straps for hand-bound soft cover journals and hanging them from a peg in his studio wall.

Untitled 84, Derrick Velasquez

Californian bookbinder-turned-artist Derrick Velasquez’ ‘Untitled’ series features layered strips of coloured vinyl hung from wall-mounted wooden forms. Gravity, accretion, repetition and colour act to create gently resolving shapes and to suggest nature from largely synthetic components.

The accumulated pieces are colourful and graphic but reassuringly full of life, like the manes of brightly rendered animals from a children’s picture book.

The works developed from the artist exploring his regular craftsman’s process of hand-cutting enclosure straps for hand-bound soft cover journals and hanging them from a peg in his studio wall.

6 months ago
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How we do at the end of the world, Digital collage, 2011, Chitra Ganesh
Today belongs to every one of this artist’s tremendously witty, entertainingly lurid collages, which I first came across at the Saatchi’s excellent 2010 exhibition The Empire Strikes Back: Indian Art Today.
The works combine scenes and characters from Indian Amar Chitra Katha comics with new illustrations and text, subverting the source material’s cultural and theologically instructive aims with the grotesque, and the vaguely poetic cod-mystic language of psychedelia.
Scenes of wounding and bodily reconfiguration recur frequently, bringing ero guro manga, the notoriously viscerally-fixated Japanese erotic adult comic subgenre, to mind.
Tenuous: This particular piece’s composition may also reference Made In Japan by Tadanori Yokoo, the singular and prolific poster artist perhaps most notable for his work for psychedelic rock bands in the ’60s and ’70s.

How we do at the end of the world, Digital collage, 2011, Chitra Ganesh

Today belongs to every one of this artist’s tremendously witty, entertainingly lurid collages, which I first came across at the Saatchi’s excellent 2010 exhibition The Empire Strikes Back: Indian Art Today.

The works combine scenes and characters from Indian Amar Chitra Katha comics with new illustrations and text, subverting the source material’s cultural and theologically instructive aims with the grotesque, and the vaguely poetic cod-mystic language of psychedelia.

Scenes of wounding and bodily reconfiguration recur frequently, bringing ero guro manga, the notoriously viscerally-fixated Japanese erotic adult comic subgenre, to mind.

Tenuous: This particular piece’s composition may also reference Made In Japan by Tadanori Yokoo, the singular and prolific poster artist perhaps most notable for his work for psychedelic rock bands in the ’60s and ’70s.

2 years ago
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Bucolic typography, unmistakably from the hand of David Hockney.
I’ll be braving the legendary queues at the Royal Academy next week to take in 'A Bigger Picture’, the expansive review of the artist’s recent work. By all accounts, the hugely popular exhibition does much to promote the 74 year-old as he would wish - vital, relevant, adventurous and idiosyncratic.

Bucolic typography, unmistakably from the hand of David Hockney.

I’ll be braving the legendary queues at the Royal Academy next week to take in 'A Bigger Picture’, the expansive review of the artist’s recent work. By all accounts, the hugely popular exhibition does much to promote the 74 year-old as he would wish - vital, relevant, adventurous and idiosyncratic.

(Source: welovetypography.com)

2 years ago
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Φ II (2011), Listerine ‘Clean Mint’ mouthwash on stainless steel, Steve Bishop.
For  me, this Toronto-born, London-resident RCA graduate has an eye for  texture and colour which lends some of his otherwise lean and  scrupulously fabricated works a sensitivity that is hugely appealing.

Φ II (2011), Listerine ‘Clean Mint’ mouthwash on stainless steel, Steve Bishop.

For me, this Toronto-born, London-resident RCA graduate has an eye for texture and colour which lends some of his otherwise lean and scrupulously fabricated works a sensitivity that is hugely appealing.

2 years ago
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